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All so obvious to Wren-Lewis but, really, all so poor

A recent blog by Simon Wren-Lewis Attacking economics is a diversionary tactic was so muddled it nicely illustrated just what is wrong with (macro)economics today. I have followed his numbered points in replying: 1. The UK imported the financial crisis from overseas due to the collapse in the US subprime market. That “collapse” just happened, exogenously. This is typical of most modern macro that is unable or unwilling to see monetary policy as an endogenous cause of the business cycle. There does not have to be a business cycle. Central banks are as not all-seeing, always wise, nearly infallible, independent responders… Read More

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“Now, it’s fair to say, the economy is near maximum employment and inflation is moving toward our goal,” U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said in a speech Wednesday in San Francisco. Therefore, Yellen, America’s No. 1 orthodox macroeconomist, promised multiple rate hikes through 2018, with hardly a flutter of concern on the part of the U.S. economic policy-making establishment. Yellen even went further, suggesting that if the Trump Administration runs big deficits, the Fed would be even more aggressive in rate hikes. In a Parallel Universe… But here is the headline on another story about inflation from the Nikkei… Read More

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“Menace vs. Magoo”

Amidst the commotion and brickbats of the Trump inauguration, monetary policy continues to tighten. We like to monitor Base Money as regularly as possible. There is often noise around the end of the year so it takes a while for the trend to be clear, but the quiet shrinkage is still very visible, driven by increased Treasury deposits replacing bank reserves plus the “sales” of assets via Reverse Repos. The YoY fall in Base Money seems to be settling down at around 7-8% per annum, not dramatic but enough to continue the slowing of nominal growth seen since after the… Read More

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We try to focus on monetary policy at NGDP Advisers. We also try to see what markets are telling us about the stance of monetary policy. The USD fell over 1% today. Why? Trump said it was too strong. In a related move, US bond yields also fell across the spectrum, continuing a trend over the last few weeks or so – mysteriously interrupted last Friday. A weakening of momentum in the economic surveys possibly meant that confidence in rate hikes lessened, and has alerted the very economically sensitive Trump to the negative impact on growth coming from the strong USD… Read More

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Bedazzled by 2.9% wage growth

Our close friend Scott Sumner seemed to fall into a trap at the weekend, heralding the 2.9% year on year growth in Average Hourly Earnings as making it “almost impossible to continue arguing for labor market slack”. Well, it is good he had the caveat, as the AHE data series that grabbed the headlines looks highly questionable. Relying on journalists and the rest of the crowd leads to big mistakes. Year on year Average Weekly Earnings growth for “Production and Nonsupervisory Employees: Total Private” fell from 2.1% to 1.9%. “Almost no slack” makes almost no sense. The 2.9% figure that grabbed the… Read More

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Jason Furman´s self-congratulatory farewell

He writes: …While these potential stumbling blocks, and longer-term economic challenges, remain, I have been deeply proud to see the recovery strengthen over the years and to pass the baton to the next Administration with an unemployment rate below 5 percent, the economy growing strongly, consumer confidence at its highest point in nearly a decade, a safer, more stable financial system, and a broadly positive economic outlook in the coming years. It´s beyond my comprehension! If we compare two deep recessions and their aftermath, you can see that one exhibited a strong and quick recovery while the other languishes in… Read More

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Monetary straitjackets are not easy to take off

Faster inflation is expected given the trends in breakeven inflation rates. Bond yields have risen as rate expectations have risen in a sort of arms race between expected inflation and expected rate rises to calm the expected inflation. This is only partly driven by expectations of economic trends, a related part is the expected liquidity impact of higher supply of bonds to fund the fiscal policies themselves. This powerful cocktail drives down bond prices independent of inflation expectations. Our market-influenced NGDP Forecast is not yet showing faster nominal growth. (Please take out a free trial or subscribe to see our proprietary chart… Read More

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Lovely Headline: “The balance of evidence suggests the U.S. is not in a recession.”

That wasn’t a sure bet when the year was young. Over the first half of 2016, various indicators pointed to a possible recession in the not-too-distant future: sharp declines in stock markets and a slowdown in job creation, falling corporate profits and contraction in the factory sector, stalled temp hiring and decelerating car sales. But as 2017 approaches, most—though not all—of those yellow warning lights have turned green again. This alternative headline “The balance of evidence suggests the U.S. is not in a recovery” much better reflects the spirit of the time. It is clearly visible in the chart. Note that “warning lights” move from yellow to green and… Read More

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The Fed Plans a Monetary Noose? No one speaks more provocatively on monetary policy—at least no one with big credentials—than Lord Adair Turner, former chairman of the British Financial Services Authority, and now affiliated with George Soros’ Institute For New Economic Thinking. Adair has also authored a book Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit, and Fixing Global Finance, Princeton University Press, 2016. To combat feeble global aggregate demand, Turner eschews fiscal policy, with the dead-on analogy that, “So you’re caught in a trap where the only solution to the trap is to make the trap a bit deeper. It… Read More

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There´s been no recovery, just a long depression

Simon Wren-Lewis writes: “When is an economic recovery not a recovery?” What do we mean when we say the economy is recovering from a recession? Do we mean it has started growing again, or do we mean it is returning to its pre-recession trend? Brief research suggests there is no standard definition, but Wikipedia is clear it is the latter. It is clear that to return to the pre-recession trend, growth has to be higher than average, but showing a growth chart as SWL does is not the most clear way to illustrate if the economy is recovering. In his exercise, SWL… Read More

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